Pro-Ject Audio Systems Box Design Factory in Slovakia - A Video Tour [Finished Boxes Pictured]

Pro-Ject Hi-Fi Electronics - A Tour of the Factory & Manufacturing Process

Pro-Ject Hi-Fi Electronics - A Tour of the Factory & Manufacturing Process

 

Pro-Ject Audio Systems builds 95% of their turntables, electronics & accessories within 440km (275mi) of the headquarters in Austria. Suffice it to say that you can count on thoughtful design & quality build from the vast majority of our product catalog. Not far from the HQ in Austria is the Slovakian factory that specializes in the precision-manufacture of Pro-Ject phono preamps, digital hi-fi electronics, amplifiers and more- referred to as Pro-Ject's Box Design series of audio gear. In this tour you'll observe advanced machinery working in unison with highly-skilled factory personnel for finer, more delicate work that requires hands-on expertise. It gives you a glimpse into just how well-built Pro-Ject's hi-fi electronics are and how they're able to make enough to keep a world of music lovers enjoying their tunes in high-fidelity stereo.


T1 Phono SB, Debut III Phono SB & A1 Accessory Pack Promo

Winter Promotions & New Products at Pro-Ject USA!

Friends of Pro-Ject,

It's been a busy fall at Pro-Ject USA and we're here to share with you the fruits of our labor! First and foremost, let's make sure you're privy to our winter specials...

Next let's cover some new products...

  • The long-awaited MaiA DS3 has arrived. Look no further for immersive amplification with all the perks: a built-in MM/MC phono stage, an onboard DAC, a Bluetooth receiver and more- it's got 9 total inputs and accommodates whatever you can throw at it.
  • Stereo Box S3 BT, a compact integrated amp with Bluetooth, is perfect for the discerning listener on a budget and with space constraints. Don't be fooled by it's tiny footprint. At 40WPC into 4 ohms and with reasonably efficient speakers, Stereo Box S3 BT can fill your room easily and with grace.
  • Amp Box S3 paves the way to building a system of separates. Offering impressive power handling for such a compact design, the sound quality will knock your socks off.
  • The new Juke Box E1 is Pro-Ject's most affordable turntable/amplifier combo- just add speakers and you're off to the races. It's all you need to play records plus an additional source. You can also use the LINE OUT function to relay your music to another system.

We extend our very best to you these remaining days of 2022 and may your holidays be filled with great-sounding music.

Happy Listening,

Pro-Ject USA


Pro-Ject Debut PRO S Tonearm with Replaceable Headshell - Top View

Introducing Debut PRO S, Power Box RS2 Phono & Vinyl NRS Box S3

Pro-Ject USA welcomes several new models to the states! Debut PRO S is takes the Debut PRO design to the next level with a 10" curved tonearm with user-replaceable headshell, CNC-machined sub-platter and Record Puck PRO. Power Box RS2 Phono provides a linear power supply option for Pro-Ject turntables & phono preamps in one impressive box. The new Vinyl NRS Box S3 gives listeners  control over noise-reduction in their vinyl playback rig. Check out the video below to learn more and stay tuned for forthcoming unboxing videos of the products introduced here. Happy listening! -Pro-Ject USA

 


Pro-Ject & Sumiko Videos!

Sumiko Stylus Replacement & A Unique Tour of the MM Design

Sumiko Phono Cartridges pair well with Pro-Ject tonearms. Their sonic synergy delivers non-fatiguing music that can be enjoyed for hours with no sacrifice to low-level detail & resolution- the things that make our music reproduction spring to life! Upgrading your stylus is an easy, low-risk path to immediate, audible improvement in your analog experience that only improves with break-in. Cartridge/stylus break-in occurs progressively as you listen. Our listeners notice the greatest degree of improvement in the 20-50 hour range. CLICK HERE to view the video tutorial for replacing and/or upgrading your Sumiko stylus on a Debut Carbon EVO tonearm! Also enjoy our gorgeous rendering of a Sumiko moving magnet cartridge in action HERE.


Pro-Ject 2Xperience SB SE Turntable (Mahogany) w/ Ortofon 2M Silver Phono Cartridge

Limited Edition 2Xperience SB SE Turntable Now Shipping!

The 2Xperience series of turntables was a hit among critical listeners in search of audiophile implementations at a real-world price. We thusly reacquaint you with the design via our limited edition 2Xperience SB SE. The highest-quality materials are implemented throughout the turntable. The parts are machined & assembled in-house by Pro-Ject in Europe, enabling 2Xperience SB SE to pack a punch you won’t find elsewhere for your dollar. Speaking of your dollar, talk to your dealer today about special promotional pricing!

From the ground up, 2Xperience SB SE features...

    • 3 TPE-damped aluminum spike-feet for optimal isolation
    • A massive MDF plinth for resonance absorption
    • A beautiful plinth finished in a high-gloss real-mahogany veneer
    • An electronic speed controller/stabilizer for ease-of-use & spot-on speed stability
    • An outboard motor suspended on TPE to isolate the motor from the cartridge
    • Purpose-designed semi-balanced, low-impedance phono interconnects for optimal signal transmission
    • A sophisticated vinyl-topped MDF composite platter with screw-down record clamp for coupling the record to the platter
    • Pro-Ject's 9cc tonearm with ABEC 7 bearings and a one-piece carbon armtube for optimal cartridge performance
    • Ortofon's 2M Silver MM phono cartridge with silver-plated copper coils for 'faster' sounding sonics
    • A hinged, removable dust cover to protect your 'table & records

Stream Box S2 Ultra - New Spotify Integration!

The latest Stream Box S2 Ultra firmware upgrade positions you for completely redeveloped Spotify integration including Spotify Connect! The update can be installed within the Stream Box S2 Ultra web interface under System > System Updates.

Stream Box S2 Ultra Firmware Update 1.079

  • Fixed metadata display for artists and albums
  • New Spotify integration
  • Spotify Connect
  • Minor bug fixes and other improvements

To use Spotify Connect you do not need to be logged in to Spotify on the Stream Box S2 Ultra. Simply update and wait for completion. Stream Box S2 Ultra will restart and it'll be recognized as a Spotify Connect device (click the small speaker symbol in the Spotify app to review/manage devices!).


Top 7 Record Stores in New Orleans

Known as a place to celebrate Mardi Gras and enjoy some delightful Cajun cuisine, New Orleans is also a great place to enjoy various types of music. New Orleans music has all the genres including jazz, R&B, soul, and so much more. Local music venues keep you dancing all night but finding some of your favorite LPs at local record stores in New Orleans is a great way to take the party home. Let’s queue up some of the best options in town for your next visit to the Big Easy.

The Mushroom

The Mushroom is a record store that originated on Tulane University Campus in 1969. In 1972, this unique record store moved to an uptown location, which is where The Mushroom New Orleans now makes its home. One of the most memorable aspects of this location is the cartoony mushrooms on the walls as you enter the front door.

As one of the oldest vinyl record stores and smoke shops in New Orleans, the owners recognize how important it is for audiophiles to hear the record before they buy it. With that being said, there are new listening stations in the shop where you can easily give your vinyl a test run. They also have huge sales on Record Store Day, so make sure to check them out.

Peaches Records

Peaches Records was located in the French Quarter since its beginning in 1975. In 2016, the record store moved to Magazine Street in Crescent City. In addition to selling LPs, they also sell music in other formats such as CDs and cassettes. Three generations have run this family-owned store, and there are some real gems you can find in their collection.

If you are interested in enjoying live music, check out this location on Record Store Day. The store will open an hour earlier than usual, and there will be live entertainment, free drinks, and ice cream for everyone to enjoy. Limited vinyl pressings will also be on sale.

Domino Sound Record Shack

Domino Sound Record Shack, located at 2557 Bayou Road in New Orleans, is a shop that sells vinyl records of all genres. They have a vast selection to sift through if you are interested in reggae, punk, or garage rock. They also have a trove of jazz and R&B albums with tons of hidden gems to enjoy. The store employs knowledgeable staff who can help you wade through the shop’s selections to find what you are looking for without judgment.

This quaint record shack also has live shows from time to time, so make sure you check with the staff to see if there is one that you will be able to attend. If you are looking to sell some of your old records, this shop also buys records for a reasonable price.

 

NOLA Mix Records

Located at 1522 Magazine Street, NOLA Mix Records is a Lower Garden District record shop where new and used vinyl is found. The independent record shop sells LPs in every genre, specializing in rock, jazz, soul, and gospel. They also have records from local artists that you can check out. There are listening stations in the shop where you can listen to new vinyl before making a purchase.

The store was founded in 2011 and started as a youth-based music production and DJ program. Because of this, the record shop still offers DJ lessons for visitors to take part in. They also have in-store events where you can enjoy the sound of local artists. NOLA Mix Records also sells merchandise like coffee cups, glasses, koozies, tote bags, and more.

 

Louisiana Music Factory

Louisiana Music Factory is found at 421 Frenchmen St, New Orleans, LA 70116. At the store, which is often referred to as LMF, you’ll find both new and used vinyl, merch like t-shirts, and even live music. Genres vary significantly at LMF – it’s pretty easy to find jazz, but don’t be surprised to find soul, blues, and indie rock at the store.

Snooks the cat is a major star at this store on Frenchmen street of the Marigny, so pay him a visit while you’re in town. When you catch a live show, you can reminisce after the fact since the store uploads the performances to YouTube.

 

Euclid Records New Orleans

While in the Bywater neighborhood of New Orleans, pay a trip to 3301 Chartres St, where you’ll find Euclid Records. At this record store, you’ll be able to find new LPs and used vinyl, seven-inch singles, and new and used CDs. There is a wide variety of artists available, ranging from Alabama Shakes to McGuire Barry. Music is also accessibly-priced, and the selection is massive.

While Euclid also has a store in St. Louis, the Bywater location is known for being far and away and having the most style and pizzazz. The exterior is painted a bright purple with yellow-painted windows for accent. Set aside a lot of spare time for a visit since the independent record store has rows upon rows of music from indie performers to tried-and-true superstars.

 

Sisters in Christ Records

Despite the devout name, Sisters in Christ Records is a relatively secular establishment that features multiple artists from a variety of labels. In addition to record sales, the 5206 Magazine St location also has a literature section and runs frequent sales.

Some of the featured artists at this record store include Uniform, Portrayal of Guilt, and Gasmiasma. You’ll also find ephemera, such as T-shirts from some of their featured bands as well as items like tote bags that feature slogans like, “Join the Punks – Sisters in Christ.”

 

Honorable Mentions for Record Stores in New Orleans

The White Roach, which can be found on Magazine Street, is a vinyl lover’s dream and has a wide variety of albums from artists like Irma Thomas, Sade, and David Bowie. The store also buys records.

The Lower Garden District’s Disko Obscura is a record store that supports smaller independent/underground artists and labels. You’ll find artists like Faze Island, ANDI, and Billy Lotion as well as merch from multiple supported artists.


New Pro-Ject Balanced Preamps & the X8 Turntable!

NOT FOR RELEASE UNTIL EMBARGO LIFT AT 08:00 AM EST APRIL 19, 2022
PRO-JECT ANNOUNCES NEW BALANCED PHONO BOXES AND X8 TURNTABLE
Sumiko Introduces the Phono Box DS3B and S3B Plus the Latest Turntable Design in the X Series

MISTELBACH, AUSTRIA (April 19, 2022) - Sumiko and Pro-Ject USA are proud to announce the new Phono Box DS3B, Phono Box S3B and X8 Turntable from Pro-Ject Audio Systems. The new products aim to offer listeners a truly balanced experience, resulting in dynamic sound, less noise and improved signal to noise ratios.

The Phono Box S3B and Phono Box DS3B round out Pro-Ject’s complete line of balanced phono stages, both offering a versatile MM/MC phono stage which features dual-mono circuitry, a fully symmetrical and discrete gain stage and balanced inputs and outputs. As the majority of Pro-Ject turntables offer a completely balanced signal from the cartridge to the junction box, a truly balanced signal results in lower noise, and the sort of quiet, deep background typically only experienced in esoteric high-end systems. Previously only available in more costly phono preamps, balanced inputs allow the quietest connection between a moving coil cartridge and the phono stage, the new phono boxes uphold the reputation of high value, high performance the Pro-Ject brand is known for.

The new X8 Turntable is a true high-end solution with major technical features adapted from the Xtension 9 and 10 models. The X8 includes a TPE damped mass-loaded platter, which is precision machined and balanced out of a single piece of aluminum, partially supported by opposing neodymium magnets which decreases the load on the main bearing. This massive, perfectly balanced platter works in concert with the precision ceramic inverted main bearing to create a smoothly rotating base for your vinyl with perfect speed stability.

Like all Pro-Ject Audio Systems products, the new models are handcrafted in Europe and will be available in the US in limited quantities via select Authorized Pro-Ject Dealers beginning April 2022. Suggested MSRP as follows -

• Phono Box S3B: $499
• Phono Box DS3B: $799
• X8: $2399 without cartridge $2499 with factory installed Sumiko Moonstone

LINK TO IMAGES: https://we.tl/t-xGozI9M7Cu

ABOUT PRO-JECT USA
Pro-Ject Audio Systems was founded by one of Austria’s leading high-end audio distributors, Heinz Lichtenegger, in early 1991. A genuine music lover and a dyed-in-the-wool audiophile, Heinz challenged the common “cost-no object” approach to analog audio equipment by manufacturing turntables, tonearms, and accessories at a reasonable price without compromising build quality or sonic performance. With his passion for high-end audio fueling a desire to take a familiar industry in a new direction, Heinz proceeded to use Pro-Ject Audio Systems as a locomotive to bring high-end gear to the masses. By adhering to that philosophy while still only using quality electronic components that deliver sound that far exceeds their stature, the engineers at Pro-Ject redefined what is possible in high-end audio and proven that great things do come in small packages. Read more at pro-jectusa.com or follow us on social @pro-jectusa.


HiFi Setup

How Much Should a Record Player Cost?

Whether it’s your first time diving into vinyl records, or you’ve been a vinyl enthusiast for years, shelling out for a record player can be equal parts exciting and nerve-wracking. Figuring out how much should a record player cost while still prioritizing sound quality is a tightrope walk indeed. Luckily, with the resurging popularity of vinyl, there are a lot of options to choose from. So you can easily find a brand and model in your price range.

 

While there’s no one-size-fits all answer to the question of how much you should spend on a record player, there are a handful of factors to consider, and pros and cons to go over. So let’s dive into the basic price range for vinyl record players, and where your money matters most.

 

What’s the difference between a turntable and a record player?

A lot of people use the words “turntable” and “record player” interchangeably, but there is a difference between the two. 

 

A turntable is the platter, tonearm, and cartridge that all work together to play your favorite album. It refers to the connected components that directly touch, hold, and read the record grooves of your vinyl.

 

A record player is an all-in-one unit that includes a turntable, but also a preamp, amplifier, and built-in speakers. Basically, with a record player you don’t need to buy or connect any external components in order to listen to your music.

 

For beginners, starting with a record player instead of a turntable that requires its own phono preamp and hi-fi stereo speakers might be the way to go. But it all depends on what you want from your set-up, and the actual model itself.

 

What are the pros and cons of buying an inexpensive turntable? 

Turntables can get very expensive, very fast. While budget-friendly options can start as low as $50 or $100, good quality mid-range turntables easily run from $300-$700, and high-quality turntables for audiophiles can easily exceed $2,000. So, you may be wondering, is there any harm with springing for cheap record players instead of the more cost prohibitive options?

 

The answer isn’t so straightforward. If your option is to choose between a discount turntable, or nothing at all, then cheaper is no doubt the way to go! Introducing yourself to the joys of an analog listening experience is worth it, even if the initial playback isn’t top quality. Learning that you love browsing the local record store for vinyl is an incredible feeling, and once you learn more about that world it’s easier to find discounts on great quality gear. 

 

There is a simplicity to a cheap record player since all the components are there. All you need to do is put an album on, and let it play. Because everything’s built in, you don’t have to worry about adjusting the tracking force or replacing the turntable cartridge, since that’s not possible.

 

There’s a reason suitcase record players are one of the most common picks for music fans on a budget. The set-up is all there, it’s portable, and all you have to do is pick which record you want to throw on for a spin.

 

However, the major con is that low-end record players are far more likely to damage the vinyl. While the best turntables will have a quality drive system and a good platter, affordable turntables are often limited in this way, and have a built-in amp, which means you can never upgrade the source of your sound.

 

Similarly, an expensive turntable is likely to have a carbon tonearm you can replace or update if needed, while a cheap model might have a plastic tonearm that’s not adjustable. The difference in tonearm and stylus quality can directly affect the shelf-life of your records, since the needle is what makes contact with your record grooves. Any damage or misalignment can create scratches on your records, and since you can’t adjust a cheap record player, you’re left to either deal with the fallout or shell out for an entirely new record player. So, even on a budget, it’s more affordable in the long-term to go for the best record player available. In some cases, checking for a slightly used retro model as your entry-level turntable is a better move than getting a new cheap one.

 

What part should you get for more money? 

If you’re buying separate components, you may be wondering what parts of the record player you should spend the most money on. Luckily, when it comes to this question, the answer is simple. Whether you’re still blasting a cd player, or you’re cueing up the belt-drive turntable, you’ll want to spend the most money on the source itself. Even if you have the most high-quality powered speakers in the game, if the stereo turntable playing your music is bad quality, you won’t be able to salvage the sound.

 

If you have the best turntable you can afford, then the model of your turntable cartridge will produce quality sound. Whether you have space efficient bookshelf speakers or a massive stereo system, the source of your sound is going to be the most deciding factor when it comes to what you hear.

 

What are the components worth investing in?

If you want the best sound possible, it’s definitely worth investing in the best components out there. No matter what model you land on, springing for a dust cover (like the Cover it E from Pro-Ject USA) is going to help protect your turntable from a lot of potential dust and long-term damage. 

 

Just as the source itself is of utmost importance, so is the upkeep of your turntable cartridge and stylus. In general, it’s recommended that you replace your stylus after 1,000 hours of listening. Depending on how much you listen, this could mean yearly or once every few years. Since this is the component that directly touches your record, you’ll want to go for a high-quality replacement cartridge (the Oyster Series from Sumiko is top notch) in order to extend the life of your collection.

 

While less sexy sounding, the quality of your rca cables also make a huge difference for your sound quality. If you have low-quality rca output, that can cause distortion and interference. But if you have high-quality rca cables (like the Pro-ject Audio Connect It Model Phono RCA on Amazon), then you’ll have a deeper soundstage and a low risk of humming.

 

In reality, the more you can invest in all components of your listening area, the better your sound will be. The easiest way to figure out the hierarchy of where your money goes is to start at the source of the turntable, which parts are replaceable on there (the stylus, the cartridge), and then prioritize the phono preamp (we recommend the Phono Box DC from Pro-ject USA) next, since a bad phono preamp connection can affect what you’ll hear through the speakers regardless of speaker quality. Your amplifier quality comes after the preamp, and the speakers, in this specific ordering of components, come last.

 

This isn’t to say that speaker quality doesn’t make a difference, it definitely does! But more that, the source and translation of the sound itself will be the initial defining factor. So if you have to spend more, spend it closer to the turntable itself.

 

The different types of turntables

 

Now that we’ve gone over the basics of pricing, and what components demand the most money, we’ve arrived at the fun part: the types of turntables. Regardless of budget, there are two basic types: direct drive turntables and belt drive turntables. 

 

In a belt drive turntable (like the Pro-ject Debut Carbon DC), the motor is connected to the platter via an elastic belt. The platter sits on a bearing that is distanced away from the motor. One pro of this design is that the elastic belt helps absorb shocks and protects the platter from catching shaky vibrations from the motor. The isolation of the motor can also result in less noise transmission to the tonearm.

 

The con is that belt drive turntables have lower torque, which means DJs can’t use them. Also, the belt can eventually wear down and require replacement. Another pro though, is that the turntable from High Fidelity was a belt drive.

 

Direct drive turntables are the most commonly used by DJs. The motor sits right under the platter, which allows for more precise speed control and the sensitivity a DJ can work with. The major pro is that these models have higher torque, consistent speeds and are less sensitive to outside forces.

 

The con is that the motor’s proximity to the platter can sometimes affect sound quality, so it’s advisable to invest in shock absorbers.

 

Another factor to consider is if you want a manual or automatic turntable (like the A1 from Pro-ject USA). An automatic turntable lifts the tonearm out of the resting position and gently lowers it onto the record at the right spot. After it’s done playing, it lifts it back up and shuts the turntable off. With a manual turntable (like Pro-ject USA’s Signature 12), you guessed it, you’ll be the one to lift the tonearm and lower it gently onto the record. 

 

The major pro to an automatic is that you don’t have to worry about finding the right spot yourself, but the con can be slightly less amazing sound quality since there are attachments on the tonearm. The pro to a manual is improved sound quality, so long as you’re comfortable doing the work.

 

To bluetooth or not to bluetooth, that is yet another one of the questions. In the digital era, having bluetooth connectivity in your hi-fi set-up can be majorly appealing. There are bluetooth record players (like the PS-LX310BT from Sony) and bluetooth receivers specifically designed to combine the convenience of bluetooth with the analog joys of vinyl. If you use bluetooth headphones and work around the house, being able to listen to records through your headphones can be a game changer. 

 

Similarly, if you use bluetooth speakers, you can connect them to your turntable to play without worrying about cords. Bluetooth is generally compatible with most entry-level turntables, but when it comes to high-quality set-ups, it can diminish the sound quality. Because of this, many of the most high-end audiophile turntables don’t allow for bluetooth connectivity at all. 

 

How Much a Record Player Costs Depends on You

At the end of the day, it’s your choice how much you spend on a turntable, which parts you sink the most into, and what type you buy. Your budget, available space, and personal priorities are all going to shape your relationship with vinyl. The most important thing is you’re enjoying the medium.


are cds worth anything pile of discs

Are CDs Worth Anything: What to Know Before You Dump your Discs

It’s not uncommon for some of us to have folders of CDs gathering dust, especially with music services like Spotify making on-demand music an easy proposition. If you're wondering "are CDs worth anything", you should know there's a lot of value in those old CDs, especially if you’re an audiophile. These days, some streaming services are losing their luster – with some famous artists like Neil Young taking down entire catalogs.

 

Additionally, in the purely streamed digital formats, music that was designed with analog listeners in mind starts to lose some of the richness inherent in older formats. This ranges from older Eminem tracks to those classics from legends like Bob Dylan. Before you opt to dump or sell your old CDs, consider that CD sales are experiencing a resurgence, and there are plenty of reasons to embrace the format.

 

Are Old CDs Worth Anything?

Not everything makes it to the streaming services. For example, there are tons of valuable CDs from the Rolling Stones and other famous acts, which have yet to make it to the Pandoras, Spotifys, and Amazon Prime Musics of the world. Some underrated compilations from your favorite artists may be missing but quickly found at your local record store in the CD section. Additionally, if you opt to one day resell, some of these rare CD pressings can easily be worth some nice cash on the resale market.

 

Are CDs Worth Anything?: Reasons to Keep Listening to CDs

While some may consider resale, it’s a good idea to hold on to your older CDs, especially if you’re a fan of audio quality. CDs also have numerous other benefits for those looking for a strong audio format, so here are a few of those to consider:

 

You Can Listen to Them Anywhere

Any New York City resident will tell you that the music streaming services aren’t always compatible with mass transit. There’s typically minimal cell service on the subway, so you have to listen to music offline. Modern CD players have stronger audio quality than cassettes, and they are also readily available for not much cash. Their versatility isn’t limited to underground travel either; you can listen to your CD collection on the go when taking a flight or whenever you’re traveling through an area without much internet service.

 

New CD Players Have Become Very Impressive

CD Box DS3 Silver Close-Up

First things first, if you’re playing your music on an old Sony Discman from 95’, you’re doing yourself a major disfavor. These older devices are inclined to skipping, and as lasers age, they become less precise, so sound quality will undoubtedly suffer. Newer players have many bells and whistles simply not present in old generation CD players. The most important for your listening experience is the digital to analog converter, known as the DAC.

 

DACs are incredibly useful for discerning music fans. These internal circuitry devices cut down jitter, which improves the timing of digital audio. DACs take digital data, change it into analog audio, and push the music to the amplifier. These devices are the chief reason why compact discs approach the sonic quality of vinyl. These circuits are common in most new players, and they can easily be found in electronic stores or Amazon.

 

Additionally, CD transports, like Pro-Ject’s CD Box RS2 T, make bringing CDs with you very simple. These couple well with DAC-enabled devices so that you can achieve high-end sound quality.

 

You Can Find Some Real Gems Almost Anywhere

Just take a walk around the neighborhood, and you can easily come across a garage sale with an array of used CDs from legends like Michael Jackson and Prince. On top of that, eBay, your local record store, and the web, in general, are excellent options for expanding your collection. These vintage pressings and promo discs will usually be much cheaper than the barcode indicates, and you can also use sites like Discogs to look into your latest finds or find more CDs to augment your collection. 

 

CD Sound Quality is Better than the Streaming Services

With the advent of the DAC, music recorded in an analog format and converted to digital for the CD-making process becomes much closer to the original recording. Artists like Coldplay, Pearl Jam, and David Bowie recorded music with a warm analog sound in mind. While vinyl records maintain that sound, the sound experience post-DAC on a CD player is definitely comparable. Unfortunately, the sound quality on streamers like Spotify and Prime Music isn’t nearly as high-quality, especially if you don’t know your way around the equalizer settings.

 

New CDs are Being Produced with Great Success

Besides rare CDs and used CDs found in record stores, famous artists are still using the medium in recent years. In fact, according to Billboard, thanks to recent CDs from Taylor Swift and Adele, CD sales are on the upswing. This is a clear indicator that music listeners are looking for more traditional formats for their listening experience. This is even happening with vinyl, which recently saw its biggest week since 1991.

 

CDs Provide the Intended Experience

 

One of the chief weaknesses of music presented on a streaming service is how disjointed the experience can be. While it’s nice to have an on-demand listening style, in many cases, albums are designed to be listened to in a sequence. This experience is completely lost unless you go out of your way to listen to an album track-by-track on Spotify or a similar service. This is especially problematic with larger projects like box sets. With a CD, all you have to do is press play and relax.

 

Don’t Underestimate the Value of a Good CD

compact discs

With formats like Blu-Ray starting to show signs of age, some dismiss the viability of older compact discs. Still, disc sales are growing, and there’s nothing quite like listening to your vintage Slim Shady EP, the Rolling Stones’ Steel Wheels Japan Tour, or the Safety EP on a disc format.

If you're still wondering "are CDs worth anything", remember that there’s nothing like holding your music in hand, which is why CDs aren’t going anywhere soon.